Mark Geier MD, Ph.D., is a world-renowned expert who spoke out against the dangers of mercury in vaccines and helped get thimerosal out of the shots like the DPT (now the DTaP). At one time he even had a successful medical practice in Rockville. However, seven years ago the Maryland Board of Physicians suspended his license because he was treating autistic children with a drug called Lupron.

But now, the regulators who stripped his credentials are in serious trouble, “ordered to each personally pay tens of thousands of dollars in damages by a judge who says the board abused its power in an attempt to humiliate the doctor and his family.” 1

In 2012, the board posted a cease-and-desist order on their website alleging “Geier had improperly prescribed medication for himself, his wife and his son while his license was suspended.”2 However, the order also somehow named the drugs in question (a serious breach) which led to a field day for online critics of Geier who began to openly mock him and his family in blogs and on comment threads.

While the family says the state publicized those details for vengeance, to punish a holistic doctor with unconventional ideas, state officials deny that, saying it was an “honest mistake.”(Inside sources tell us the state is 100% lying and unethical and was on an outright witch hunt.)

But, regardless of whether or not it was an accident, Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin sided with the Geiers and awarded them $2.5 million in damages, calling the order a “significant breach of medical privacy.” He went on to accuse the board and its staff for failing to preserve emails related to the case and pleading ignorance about the order on the witness stand.3

He said,

“If their testimony were to be believed, which the court does not, it is the worst case of collective amnesia in the history of Maryland government and on par with the collective memory failure on display at the Watergate hearings.”4

He ordered 14 board appointees, the board’s lead attorney and the lead investigator on the Geier case to pay half of the damages out of their own pockets, between $10,000 and $200,000 apiece, depending on their net worth.5

The defendants plan to appeal the decision and the spokeswoman for the Maryland Attorney General’s Office, Raquel Coombs said, “We believe there are serious errors in both the facts and the law and will vigorously pursue those on appeal.”6 Sure you will Raquel, do you even have a soul? I don’t think so. #SatansLittleHelper

The Washington Post had the following propaganda drivel to say,

“Public health experts consider “anti-vaxxers” as a grave threat to one of the most significant medical developments in human history. Some Facebook users share Geier’s videos to urge against flu shots, even amid the worst flu outbreak in nearly a decade.”7(Wash Post, you forgot that many died right after their flu shots and some didn’t even have the flu).

While many of the case records remain under seal, the order shows that board staff continued to track blogs and news articles, chronicled his downfall, mocked him and his child in emails, and totally reveled “in their humiliation.”8 Super professional.

In fact, board attorney Victoria Pepper, who drafted the cease-and-desist order, was known to refer to Geiers as “Daddy G” and “Baby G”9 in emails to board investigator Josh Shafer (he led the probe of the Geiers). In one email he responded, “Maybe we can help make it a bad month.”

“At trial, Pepper said she knew the Geiers’ private medical information would be online as a result of the order, but didn’t think it would be embarrassing. She said she named the drugs to clarify that they weren’t dangerous controlled substances and named the recipients to clarify that Geier wasn’t prescribing the medication or juveniles.

The judge called those reasons ‘fabrications,’ adding that ‘Pepper viewed Dr. Geier and his practice to be so abhorrent that she was willing to do ‘whatever it took’ to tarnish his reputation.’”10

In his ruling, Judge Rubin said, “The Board of Physicians is not an ornamental office. It is a serious public trust. It was breached horribly in this case.”11 We couldn’t agree more.

We are delighted that justice has been served. As the defendants are appealing, we will update you as more information becomes available.

Sources and References

  1. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  2. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  3. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  4. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  5. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  6. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  7. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  8. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  9. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  10. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.
  11. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.